• An Account of the remains of the worship of Priapus, lately existing at Isernia, in the kingdom of Naples; in two letters, one from Sir William Hamilton to Sir Joseph Banks and the other from a person residing at Isernia; to which is added, A discourse on the worship of Priapus, and its connexion with the mystic theology of the ancients (1786).
  • A Discourse on the Worship of Priapus, and Its Connexion with the Mystic Theology of the Ancients. Richard Payne Knight, esq. London: R.P. Knight, 1865
  • Roman Fascinum.
  • In ancient Roman religion and magic, the fascinus or fascinum was the embodiment of the divine phallus. The word can refer to the deity himself (Fascinus), to phallus effigies and amulets, and to the spells used to invoke his divine protection. Pliny calls it a medicus invidiae, a “doctor” or remedy for envy (invidia, a “looking upon”) or the evil eye. […] The English word “fascinate” ultimately derives from Latin fascinumand the related verb fascinare, “to use the power of the fascinus,” that is, “to practice magic” and hence “to enchant, bewitch.”